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Home > Blog > Online Marketing & SEO > How to Improve Conversion Rates - With One Word
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How to Improve Conversion Rates - With One Word

It's not about making your buttons green, blue or red. It's not about keeping the copy as short as possible. It's not about having everything above the page fold.

It's not about the latest 'one weird tip to improve conversion'.
It's about Context.

It's easy to get caught up in case studies reading how 'X colour was more effective' or 'We improved form conversion by reducing the amount of inputs'. In reality, the essential thing is context. One website may have found a colour more effective for conversion because it was constrast to their website colour theme. Likewise, the site that found form conversion went up when they reduced input fields, but at the cost of qualified leads.

Most importantly, it ultimately shouldn't be about aesthetic context. Pretty colours and big CTA's will only go so far if your copy is poor. It needs to be about understanding the intent of your typical users. You should be considering and answering questions like 'What are our users trying to accomplish, and why?' 'Is our funnel clear for our users? Are they getting lost?' It needs to be  about determining your users unique intents, desires and predisposed doubts, and adjusting accordingly.

3 Real Cases of Improving Conversion Based on Context:

1.

What's Going to Happen with my Private Details?

Ever worked in an industry that suffers from stigma? People need confidence and conviction in a brand before handing over their personal details. If they have any concerns about you, they'll be unlikely to convert.

For one of our clients in the professional finances industry, we determined that users were particularly concerned about the privacy of their details. We trialed drastic and subtle changes to copy, design and layout with negligible differences.

What Improved Conversion?

A clear presentation of the companies privacy policy and disclaimer in plain sight near our call to action. My assumption would be that it wouldn't even matter what you wrote in the disclaimer - While our client's privacy policy was genuine, it felt like the fact that is was being shown in broad daylight would suggest to users you have nothing to hide ... a bit like McDonald's nutritional/calorie information.

Old Version

New Version [5.85%+]

Adding a privacy disclosure statement in this context appeared to add an element of trust.

2.

More CTA's ≠ More Leads

One of our clients operate in a fiercely competitive industry where even the slightest improvement in conversion makes a huge different to ROI. Similar to case one, there also may be factors of issues with trust.

While we generally introduce only one element at a time for A/B split testing, one element we did not consider at the time was the frequency of the CTA. We had three: One above the page fold, in the center of the content, and in the footer.

What Improved Conversion?

We trialed removing 2/3 of the in-content CTA's above the page fold and in the center of the content. Conversions notably improved and we determined that user trust was being jeopardised by pushing our call to actions too aggressively. 'Why does this company seem so desperate for me to contact them?' 'Is there something dodgy about this?' In this context, allowing the user to read through the copy in peace and be presented with one solid CTA at the end resulted in an improvement in lead conversion.

Old Version

New Version [6.30%+]

Using 1 CTA instead of mid-content CTA's in this context was more effective.

3.

I Don't Want to Call You

We found a case of catering to user intent from the real estate industry. On the website's property listings, the control CTA was a button labelled 'Call Agent'. We determined that 'Calling' may be too much of a time commitment for property browsers. Not everyone necessarily wanted to organise an inspection or speak to an agent at length - They might of simply had a casual enquiry they didn't feel was worth bothering the agent about.

What Made the Difference?
Trialing the button label 'Email Agent' verse 'Call Agent' found a significant improvement in online enquiries. Not only did enquiries increase as users did not feel obliged to only enquire if they felt their enquiry was worthy enough, but the agent's preferred receiving their leads via email. Would this work for every client? Not necessarily - Some industries and their users don't have the time to email and sit around waiting for an indefinite response. They need immediate action and want to call. Likewise, there would be industries where sales staff would much prefer to immediately speak to prospective leads over the phone rather than email.
In this case however, it was a win-win.

Old Version

New Version [19.01%+]

cta-3.jpg

What's the takeaway from all this?
It's essential to look at conversion rate optimisation beyond colours, sizes and shapes. While aesthetic elements can definitely make a noteable improvement, catering to your audience's desires, addressing their concerns and developing their trust is much more of a long-term, scalable solution.

Instead of thinking about what colour would convert, put yourself in the shoes of your user. Journey through your website funnel, identifying any conversion leaks that could turn away a prospective lead, and plug them.

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